Careers Contact Us
Start A Project mobile

First thing’s first, let’s talk about some basic hydraulics. Most shorter length culverts are inlet controlled and just about all storm sewers are outlet controlled. So for storm sewers, the flow is limited by the outlet conditions of the pipe and the roughness inside the pipe matters. The primary method to determine the flow rate (Q) of a storm

Learn More

The design, manufacture and installation of Concrete, Corrugated Steel, Plastic and Steel Reinforced Polyethylene pipe happens every day for storm sewers and culverts. While most design engineers spent many hours in college learning about hydrology and hydraulics, how many spent time studying the buoyancy of pipe materials in the field? While most

Learn More

A question that comes up frequently: “Will this alternate pipe solution convey the same amount of flow that’s shown on these set of plans?”And the one thing most people tend to dread hearing is the same tired response: well, that depends. Why does it always have to depend on something? Just give me an answer: yes or no?As an engineer, it has been

Learn More

 I’ve recently been seeing engineers choosing what I feel are inappropriate Manning’s “n” coefficients for sewer design.  Some choose too conservative values, while others don’t understand that long term creep within the pipe wall may adversely affect the hydraulic performance of certain pipe types.  A few things to consider are as follows: 

Learn More

Culverts and buried bridge structures rely on a number of practical design and installation criteria to ensure they function structurally, hydraulically and aesthetically. Such structures need to be sized to fit the site hydraulic requirements. Additionally, they need to be installed with proper backfill material, placement and compaction methods.

Learn More