The Stormwater Blog 

Contech Stormwater experts discuss designing stormwater BMP’s, regulations, maintenance issues, and all things stormwater.


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What Tools Are in Your Stormwater Toolbox?
Over the last 20 years of site-civil design, it has been interesting to see stormwater trends come and go.  Some design methodologies have disapp...
Don’t Bypass Good Design Part 1: Offline Vs. Online Diversion Structures
Months of design, pages of specifications, and tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars may go into the design of a single bioswale, filtration b...
Did My Rainwater Harvesting System Just Text Me?
As rainwater harvesting is becoming a more popular choice for stormwater management and runoff reduction, additional features are becoming available to allow for monitoring, report generation, and managing systems from a website interface.

 

 

Designing CMP Detention Systems: Part Two – Cost Effective Design and Layout

The goal of any CMP detention system should be to maximize the vertical space available to minimize the overall footprint, to reduce material, excavation, and backfill costs. To do this we recommend using the largest diameter pipe possible.

Designing CMP Detention Systems: Part One – The Value of Going Underground
The two essential functions of a stormwater management system are to control the quality and quantity of runoff leaving a site. There are various ways to do this; a common method is with an above ground system in the form of a detention pond.
Rain Gardens Not Permitted?

Current stormwater design guidance typically recommends starting with preservation of the natural landscape and hydrology wherever feasible. But, even with preservation, new stormwater management facilities are likely to be required to capture and clean runoff from pollution generating surfaces. These new stormwater facilities are likely to include imported soil or soil amendments that add permeability and/or optimize soil structure for vegetative growth. For many years, the industry has characterized media in vegetated facilities generically as soil, sand, compost, etc.

Rainwater Harvesting and Make Up Water: The Why, When, and How

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) stores rainwater for reuse to supply non-potable uses like irrigation, wash water, toilet flushing, and laundry.  During long dry periods the demand will drain the storage cistern down to a critical level where the pressurization pump(s) will need to shut down to prevent dry run damage.  Make up water is typically a potable connection to the rainwater harvesting system to supply water, allowing the RWH system to continue to supply the non-potable end use applications until the next storm event refills the storage cistern.

Bioretention Part Two: Lessons Being Learned - Design Considerations

As a volume based stormwater control measure, bioretention systems are providing beneficial use in that they reduce runoff volumes and peak flows. In areas where combined sewers are an issue bioretention can reduce CSO frequency while increasing evapotranspiration and helping with groundwater recharge via infiltration processes. Common design criteria include storage volume and a design infiltration rate of the media and the underlying native soils. These criteria are tied to the site characteristics and statistical hydrology, for example, design the storage volume such that 95% of the mean annual runoff volume is retained. In addition to these sizing criteria we also need to design with these other factors in mind.

Bioretention Part One: Lessons Being Learned

As bioretention becomes more popular, many types of designs are being deployed throughout the U.S.  Though relatively simple in concept, many are finding that the devil is in the details with respect to maintenance and performance.  These issues are driving newer designs and improving criteria for use. Over my next few posts, I will be sharing some of the experiences and lessons learned with bioretention design. 

 

Subsurface Infiltration as a LID Stormwater Management Strategy
The only sure way to eliminate stormwater pollution is to eliminate stormwater runoff. In recognition of this fact, Green Infrastructure (GI) and Low Impact Development (LID) practices have prioritized runoff reduction as a primary regulation for stormwater management.  These practices have proliferated throughout the United States.


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