The Stormwater Blog 

Contech Stormwater experts discussing Low Impact Development, Onsite Water Management, Rainwater Harvesting and all things Stormwater.


Filtration


NO Image:
Sizing Considerations for Stormwater Filtration Systems
There are several factors to consider when selecting the most appropriate stormwater filtration solution for a specific site.  Several of these factors easily come to mind, such as: state or jurisdiction regulations, hydraulic grade line limitations, footprint constraints, and other site restrictions.  One variable that is often overlooked when reviewing a site is the methodology used to determine the specific quantity of filter cartridges or filter media.  Filter designs fall under one of three methods: flow-based design, volume-based design, or mass-load design.  
Categories: Treatment, Filtration
Leave the Bio in BioFilter...Plants Do Matter
Plants provide fresh oxygen to breathe and beautiful aesthetics that can take our breath away, but many people don’t think about the role plants can play in stormwater treatment. The principal notion of Low Impact Development (LID) is founded upon mimicking pre-development conditions. Part of mimicking pre-development conditions includes not just matching pre-development peak flow rates, but also matching the pollutant load discharging from the drainage area.
All Stormwater Particles Are Not The Same Part 2: Particle Shape And Density

EPA selected a removal standard of 80% total suspended solids (TSS) removal as the target pollutant of concern due to high TSS concentrations ubiquitous impact on water quality and degradation to aquatic habitat. Many other pollutants of concern are particle-bound, and TSS is thereby a surrogate for other pollutants. Testing methodologies for stormwater control measures (SCMs) in respects to TSS can vary greatly. There are many sediment characteristics that should be considered when evaluating a SCM for TSS removal performance to ensure apples and apples are being compared among removal efficiencies for SCMs.

All Stormwater Particles Are Not The Same. Part 1: Particle Size And Composition

The EPA selected a removal standard of 80% total suspended solids (TSS) removal as the target pollutant of concern due to high TSS concentrations impact on water quality and degradation to aquatic habitat. Many other pollutants of concern are particle-bound, and TSS is thereby a surrogate for other pollutants. Testing methodologies for stormwater control measures (SCMs) in respects to TSS can vary greatly. In part two, we’ll continue our look at stormwater sediment and discuss particle shape and density and their affect on TSS removal.

Hydrodynamic Separators vs. Oil/Water Separators

There are a vast number of stormwater separators on the market which can make it challenging when selecting the ideal solution for each project.  Hydrodynamic separators and oil/water separators are often used interchangeably in the industry but each system is unique and one may be better suited for the overall treatment goals of the project.   So what is the difference between a hydrodynamic separator and an oil water separator and how can you determine which one is best suited for your project?

Media Filtration vs. Membrane Filtration: What’s the Big Difference?

Stormwater regulations are increasing calling for an increased level of treatment. This often takes the form of filtration systems. Two types of filtration systems used in stormwater are media filtration and membrane filtration.

Media Filtration systems are defined as filters that function through the use of physical capturing of pollutants, as well as absorption of pollutants through chemical reactions.  Typical media based filtration systems are composed of sand, stone, organics, or other materials.  The media utilized is typically chosen to target specific pollutants for removal.

Categories: Treatment, Filtration
Rainwater Harvesting Filters Explained
Most people do not think about how they get the water they use; they just turn on the tap and the water is there. The same holds true for rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems. Most people understand there is a cistern that collects and holds the harvested water. But what they may not realize is that with every large scale RWH system there is a mechanical system that pumps, filters, and treats the harvested water before it can be reused.
6 Key Points of Developing a Stormwater Trash Control Strategy
In my last blog post, What Kind of Trash and Debris is in Stormwater Runoff?, I wrote about the types of trash found in stormwater and the effects trash and debris have on our environment and infrastructure. 

Continuing with the topic of trash control; if your community is interested in developing a trash control strategy here are six key points that should be considered
Why Filter Stormwater?
Remember when stormwater filtration was at the forefront of runoff water quality treatment?  Have the variables and performances that led to its successful history been displaced by recent Green Infrastructure (GI) or Low Impact Development (LID) initiatives, or is filtration a viable partner in the GI and LID arena?  Boiling it down, why should we filter stormwater?
Evaluating Media for the Filtration of Stormwater

During the past decade, a number of different media have been used for stormwater filtration and more recently for bioretention. Media such as sand, peat, and compost have been used successfully. Uses of perlite, zeolite, carbon, and other "exotic" media have expanded the choices for targeting specific pollutants. Media are now being used to target TSS, Petroleum Hydrocarbons, Dissolved Phosphorus, dissolved metals and even bacteria. More recent research in biofiltration adds elements of biological uptake of nutrients and metals by plants, conversion of Nitrogen into ammonia in anaerobic zones.

Categories: Treatment, Filtration
Page 1 of 2First   Previous   [1]  2  Next   Last   

Stormwater Blog Update Hubspot subscription form

We respect your privacy,
your email will only be used to send
Stormwater blog updates.