The Stormwater Blog 

Contech Stormwater experts discussing Low Impact Development, Onsite Water Management, Rainwater Harvesting and all things Stormwater.

How to Size a Hydrodynamic Separator
Hydrodynamic Separators (HDS) have been used in the stormwater industry for over 20 years.  They are effective at removing TSS, hydrocarbons, and trash and debris from stormwater runoff and are often used for standalone treatment or pretreatment to filtration, detention, infiltration and rainwater harvesting system.  With the varied applications for HDS units comes a multitude of sizing options. 
Did My Rainwater Harvesting System Just Text Me?
As rainwater harvesting is becoming a more popular choice for stormwater management and runoff reduction, additional features are becoming available to allow for monitoring, report generation, and managing systems from a website interface.

 

 

6 Corrugated Metal Pipe Detention Design Questions

For the majority of applications, corrugated metal pipe (CMP) is the “go to” material for subsurface infiltration. This in turn, leads to a lot of design questions. Below is a list of six questions and answers we received from a recent webinar on designing CMP detention systems.

Categories: Detention
Leave the Bio in BioFilter...Plants Do Matter
Plants provide fresh oxygen to breathe and beautiful aesthetics that can take our breath away, but many people don’t think about the role plants can play in stormwater treatment. The principal notion of Low Impact Development (LID) is founded upon mimicking pre-development conditions. Part of mimicking pre-development conditions includes not just matching pre-development peak flow rates, but also matching the pollutant load discharging from the drainage area.
Hydrodynamic Separation Devices: Online Vs. Offline
The question of whether a hydrodynamic separator should be online vs. offline is something that engineers and stormwater treatment manufacturers deal with on a daily basis.  Online systems allow storm events that are greater than the design storm to be bypassed through the treatment unit, eliminating the need for a separate bypass structure.  This results in fewer structures and a smaller system footprint; which leads to a lower landed cost.  
Designing CMP Detention Systems Part Three – Design Red Flags
In our third and final part of our blog series we will look at design red flags for CMP detention systems. Red flags are design elements that are commonly or easily overlooked and may need extra attention when designing. Considering the red flags upfront will expedite the design and fabrication process, and eliminate delays, installation, and performance issues.
Designing CMP Detention Systems: Part Two – Cost Effective Design and Layout

The goal of any CMP detention system should be to maximize the vertical space available to minimize the overall footprint, to reduce material, excavation, and backfill costs. To do this we recommend using the largest diameter pipe possible.

Designing CMP Detention Systems: Part One – The Value of Going Underground
The two essential functions of a stormwater management system are to control the quality and quantity of runoff leaving a site. There are various ways to do this; a common method is with an above ground system in the form of a detention pond.
Maintenance Resiliency of Stormwater Treatment Facilities
With the passage of time and the placement of stormwater treatment facilities into service in urbanized areas, it’s been possible to observe how these facilities age. All too often, the majority of effort and focus is placed upon the design and construction of stormwater treatment facilities, which are often neglected or forgotten once construction is complete. Depending on circumstances, this often results in deferred (if not nonexistent) maintenance of these facilities, which only worsens with time as the facilities age and accumulate collected pollutants with each passing year.
Categories: Maintenance
Rain Gardens Not Permitted?

Current stormwater design guidance typically recommends starting with preservation of the natural landscape and hydrology wherever feasible. But, even with preservation, new stormwater management facilities are likely to be required to capture and clean runoff from pollution generating surfaces. These new stormwater facilities are likely to include imported soil or soil amendments that add permeability and/or optimize soil structure for vegetative growth. For many years, the industry has characterized media in vegetated facilities generically as soil, sand, compost, etc.

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